Tag Archives: Chican@

Flyers from La Raza

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Hello,

In preparation for our upcoming documentary premier, we’ve been combing through our Chican@ Movement collection. Check out these new arrivals, click here to see the whole collection.

And please join us on Saturday August 12th at 4pm for the Bay Area premier of Symbols of Resistance at the Roxie Theater!! Get your tickets here.

peace Nathaniel

Created by the San Patricio Corps Solidarity Organization Flyer for talk by Gabino Gomez on work of CDP in Mexico (front) Flyer for talk by Gabino Gomez on work of CDP in Mexico (back) Created by the New Movement in Solidarity With the Mexican Revolution (front) Created by the New Movement in Solidarity With the Mexican Revolution (back) Flyer citing repression against the Left in Mexico (front) Flyer citing repression against the Left in Mexico (back) Created by the New Movement in Solidarity With the Mexican Revolution
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Created by the New Movement in Solidarity With the Mexican Revolution (front)

 

New Additions to the Freedom Archives

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Hello,

We’ve got some great new materials up on our search site!

Statements from International Women’s Day: Statements in honor of International Women’s Day, 1983, in solidarity with all freedom fighters and prisoners of war. Published by Women Against Imperialism.

3 poems from Chicano Poet Tomas Vigil: Originally recorded by SF Bay Area radio collective Comunicacion Aztlan.

Critica:

Marche:

Nation:

 

I-Hotel Calendar: This calendar focuses on the struggle to keep the tenants of the International Hotel from being evicted during 1977. Each month has a pertaining photo that features photography from the protests, personal photos of tenants in their rooms, poetry and more.

Don’t hesitate to contact us info [at] freedomarchives [dot] org if you want to donate archival materials to the Freedom Archives and stay tuned for new arrivals.

-Nathaniel

 

The Search for Identity

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arianaDuring my third semester at the Freedom Archives I cataloged the raw audio materials of Colin Edwards’ series on Californians of Mexican Descent. In this ten part radio program from the early 1960s, Edwards interviewed Mexican-Americans from various socioeconomic backgrounds in order to create a comprehensive series that grasps the multiplicity of the Mexican-American experience. Through a series of patterned questions asked to each interviewee, themes including conflict over identities, pressures towards assimilation and divisions between generations, were all explored. It was interesting to find that many of the themes present in this series are sentiments that still exist within Chicano/as community. There is an underlying sense of not qualifying as solely Mexican or American, but rather needing to successfully navigate through and occupy both spheres. Although there were many relatable issues, one thing that struck me when listening to these interviews was the various outlooks towards discrimination faced by the Mexican-American community.

Accounts of racial, social and economic discrimination varied amongst the interviewees but having grown up in a predominantly Latino community, I was unaware of discrimination towards Chican@s in educational or professional settings. I never felt like a “minority” in the community which I grew up in and those surrounding me I was always part of a majority population where there was no discrimination based on being “other”. It was not until I moved away for college that I was made so conscious of my ethnicity and culture. At home, it was easy to navigate being Mexican-American because most people were Latino so there was a semblance of a shared experience. Now that I have left that comfort zone and I interact with diverse populations I feel the need to be an American who simultaneously embodies and educates others on the whole Latino experience, who points out the intersections of gender, race and economic standing. In college, a defining feature of my identity is the fact that I am Mexican. I am often questioned about my language, customs and asked to challenge ill-informed stereotypes. At home I am seen as too American because I am not fluent in Spanish and I don’t retain traditional customs and beliefs, I am deviating from my upbringing.

After listening to individuals sharing their sentiments and experiences, I felt a sort of validation. Never before had I worked with materials in an academic setting that explores what for me is a lived reality. Seeing this specific form of social history documented and studied in such a way reinforces the importance of individual lived realities. Even in institutions of higher education where students are actually given the chance to study different histories, they don’t always get the chance to work with such personal accounts that resonate with and reinforce overarching historical themes.

If you would like to support our internship program you can make a donation here.

-Ariana Varela

Recent Outreach Updates

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WhenFreedomBecomesResponsibility2

Zine created and published by Brenda Montaño

Greetings,

This past week has been a busy one for the Archives! Please consider making a donation (on our blog) or here to help the archives continue to remain grounded in the community and conduct outreach programs such as these:

Asian Pacific American Library Association Conference at USF: We presented at the Building Bridges with Organizations Community Session which brought together a wide range of community organizations and Asian American librarians from all over the country. The session provided us an opportunity to showcase our resources, meet with potential collaborators in the Asian American community, and forge connections with libraries, information centers, and other organizations.

UC Berkeley Debate Camp: We visited a high school policy debate camp at UC Berkeley to talk with students about this upcoming year’s topic which is about curtailing domestic surveillance. We watched COINTELPRO 101 to provide students with a robust historical context on the issue of government surveillance and discussing the political stakes of domestic surveillance beyond individualistic privacy rights. After the documentary we split into breakout groups to further engage certain topics and get feedback from the students. The discussions were wonderful and the students were able to connect issues such as Stop and Frisk, TSA searches and Islamophobia to larger issues of counter-insurgency and state repression.

When Freedom Becomes Responsibility- Collecting Stories of Xican@ Resistance in Colorado: A former intern, colleague and comrade Brenda Montaño debuted her zine highlighting her experiences working with us in Colorado on our upcoming documentary on the Xican@ student movement. Lots of great stuff in this zine!!! To purchase her work search SING YOUR LIFE LITERATURE PRODUCTS on etsty.com.

-Nathaniel

The Youth Brigades at Tierra Amarilla

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Greetings,

The work on our next documentary focusing on the Chican@ struggle in the Southwest continues to reveal essential aspects of the movement and their historical and present day manifestations. In the clip below, movement elder Ricardo Romero takes us through the history of the youth brigades at Tierra Amarilla,  the importance of history and culture to sustaining the struggle and explains why youth based, collective initiatives such as this are so important.

Whether represented by the youth activism of Ricardo Falcon, UMAS (United Mexican American Student) organization, and “Los Seis de Boulder” in the 1970s, or present day youth brigades (having now served over 800 young people) it is clear youth engagement and empowerment continues to be essential to the Chican@ struggle. Stay tuned for more clips as the filming process progresses!

You can support the Youth Brigades HERE!

-Nathaniel

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